WANDisco

Okay, I’m not even 100% sure what the heck this WANDisco software does.  I know what Subversion is and how to use it, and I know what a WAN is (Wide Area Network for the less geeky), but why would you need additional software to use Subversion over a WAN?  I must be missing something.  And frankly I don’t have the patience to sift through a bunch of technical mumbo jumbo and buzzwords to figure out that it does nothing, or that it does something totally useless to me.  I love the name though – WANDisco.  Pure genius.  Dance, bitches!

But seriously, that brings me to my next point.  Why obfuscate your purpose or your service behind 16,000 words of ridiculous jargon that even you don’t fully understand, just to sound more important, or more impressive?  I’d rather get to a page that says: WANDisco connects several remotely located work areas to a single Subversion server.  Even that is kind of detailed – it assumes that you know what Subversion is.  Let’s try again: WANDisco connects many remotely located work areas to a single code repository.  Getting there.  I should think of a better way to describe a code repository.  But you get the idea – 8 pages of technobabble gets no love from me. 

The problem is, it gets lots of love from Buyers.  By Buyers I mean all the corporate bigwigs that (in most cases, though not all) know two things about IT.  Jack and, in the best cases, Shit.  They read all the buzzwords, make a mental correlation to the buzzwords they read in their Business 2.0 magazine (which they hardly understand anyway), and think “Wow!  This product must be awesome!” based on nothing more than the fact that they included The Right Words.  Hey, that’s what an IT department is for.  They decode the spew and figure out how to integrate it.

Unfortunately, to some extent the same can be said for getting hired at a larger corp.  They’ve probably hired a contracting agent to look at hundreds (heck, sometimes thousands) of resumes.  The ones that stand out – the ones that contain all the buzzwords and key items, are the ones that are going to get filtered through.  This would actually be A Good Thing if those were always the qualified candidates, but I’m sure more than one slips through the cracks because of Jargon Underuse.  Sigh.

This isn’t to say that WANDisco is culpable of this, mind you.  While a bit overcomplicated, their site is fairly self-explanatory if you’re willing to sit and read all that stuff.  But man, that’s just a lot of stuff to describe a product that I’m not even sure of the purpose of.